DIY Tech Tips

How To Mount A Solo Seat

In this article Kyle from Lowbrow Customs shows the parts necessary for a sprung solo seat, and how to install it step-by-step. The install is shown with a Biltwell, Inc. Solo Seat and Pivot, and Lowbrow Customs Weld-On Spring Mounts and Seat Springs. All the parts necessary can be found here.

Adding a solo seat to your motorcycle can make a huge difference in appearance and riding comfort, especially on a rigid framed bike. Here Kyle from Lowbrow Customs shows the installation of a solo seat step-by-step on his first Triumph build with a David Bird hardtail.

The first step in installing a solo seat is getting the necessary parts, which include a solo seat, front pivot or seat mount, a pair of springs, and spring mounts. Spring mounts can be fabricated or bought ready to weld on.

Mock up the seat and pivot and decide where it needs to be positioned for your height and riding position; the pictures shows a typical set up.
Measure the studs on the bottom of your seat pan to determine the distance needed between the spring mounts.
Mark the centerline on your hardtail's cross-member and use your measurements to locate the spring mount positions.
As you can see these spring mounts are radiused to make mounting easy as possible.
Tack the spring mounts and make sure to check your measurements again before welding them in place. You can lay a bead on one mount and move to the next mount to let each cool as you weld them up.
Bolt the seat pivot to the solo seat and again mock it up and mark the location of the weld-on seat pivot tab on the backbone of the frame.
You can then tack the solo seat pivot in place, remove the allen head bolt from the seat pivot, and then finish welding the front mount.
Mount your solo seat on the pivot. The slotted front pivot allows for adjustment of your seat position. Leather washers on the spring mounts keeps the springs from wearing away your paint, and also keeps the springs from squeeking.
Fender washers can be used to help hold the springs in place when you tighten down the nuts on the seat studs. Keep in mind that the springs compress when you sit on the seat, so make sure your seat is mounted level and not at a downward angle that will make you slide back when riding.
Kyle with his finished seat, one step closer to being on the road.